How Weight Loss May Help Treat Osteoarthritis in Obese Patients

We all know physical fitness is essential to premium health, but specific research reveals medical issues that can be especially aggravated by excess weight. A recent study, published in the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (1), suggests that weight loss can help combat osteoarthritis – reducing both the likelihood of its onset and continuing ill effects on the body.

The report is based on numerous studies that have been conducted on weight loss as a potential deterrent of osteoarthritis. The general consensus of the previous research is that the significant correlation between the two health challenges could mean that obesity transforms the body into an osteoarthritic environment: prolific generation of inflammatory compounds, greater propensity toward pain, and reduced range of motion in the extremities.

Weight loss to prevent osteoarthritis

Perhaps the most shocking finding presented in the article is how profoundly weight loss benefits the knees. Obesity is such a strong trigger for knee osteoarthritis, the study found, that 1 out of every 2 instances of joint deterioration in that part of the body could be curbed if weight were reduced in patients. Although that statistic is startling, it makes sense that extra pounds disallow one’s joints to function properly.

One reason weight loss can prevent osteoarthritis is due to a substance in the body that becomes more prevalent during obesity. Produced by the endocrine system, white adipose tissue (WAT) stimulates the body to have inflammatory responses to physical activities and bodily processes. Furthermore, when under the stress of obesity, the body’s fascia and tendons become more susceptible to pain, and high blood pressure and pre-diabetes become more likely to arise.

Weight loss benefits for the knees are not limited to the pain of osteoarthritis. In severe cases of the disease, the cartilage becomes so degraded that the knee has to be replaced. Weight loss could avoid an extraordinary number of surgeries to replace the knee – over 111,000 each year, according to the research.

The authors of the study believe that weight loss is an extraordinarily powerful way to treat osteoarthritis. Many physicians, they suggest, need to be more conscious of the degree to which weight disorders and osteoarthritis are connected.

Optimal success with weight loss

Many Atlanta residents want to lose weight, but weight loss strategies don’t always achieve their desired results. To strengthen your chances of reaching weight loss goals, work with a team of multidisciplinary specialists at the area’s most dedicated practice: the Atlanta Medical Clinic.

Sources:

(1) http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130308143846.htm

Osteoarthritis on a Cellular Level

stem cell osteoarthritisArthritis is a disease in which bone and/or cartilage in the affected individual’s body is lost. This process of degeneration in turn reshapes the joint (causing, for instance, severely bent fingers in extreme, long-developing cases). A proper program of pain management and physical therapy – what we offer – is not only affective at alleviating symptoms of pain but also protects against progression of the disease.

The healthy functioning of joints is disrupted in the case of osteoarthritis (1) Typically a joint experiences a fluid injury and repair process at the cellular level if it becomes damaged or re-damaged. This injury/repair cycle is completed by cells called chondroclasts and chondroblasts.

Osteoarthritis, however, does not allow these cells to perform their roles effectively. Instead, another type of cell, the osteoblast, enters the picture, creating additional cartilage and bone in improper locations – such as spurs (2). This nonstandard cellular development leads to swollen, painful body parts. Alleviating pain in joints, such as hand or knee pain relief, is then often medically sought.

Protein Release Hindered

Osteoarthritis prevents the cells that make up a person’s cartilage from releasing a sufficient quantity of protein when repair of joint cartilage is required. The demand for repair at a cellular level, then, is not met. Cartilage, which is typically taut, begins to loosen. As the arthritic condition becomes more ingrained, fraying of the cartilage occurs, as does cracking and pitting. The more degradation that occurs throughout the cartilage cells, the less flexible its fibers will be (3). It becomes less and less able to protect itself, creating a downward spiral. The joint in general is put at risk by cellular cartilage weakness, increasing the likelihood of deterioration.

Untreated Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis can quickly become painful, but treating it means that its progress can be slowed or stopped altogether. The reason that’s important is that, left untreated, the pitting and cracking can become more pronounced, eventually resulting in total removal of the cartilage.  When no cartilage remains, a person begins to experience bone-on-bone direct contact during activity. The affected areas of bone become reshaped, then, as activity grinds down the cells, following the reshaping of the cartilage that has occurred. When the bones no longer join up properly, range of motion can decrease significantly.

Treated Osteoarthritis

Again, when osteoarthritis is treated, the deterioration can be mitigated. What we offer at the Atlanta Medical Clinic is extraordinary considered to many solutions for hand or knee pain relief or wherever cellular damage has become the most severe: a complete spectrum of pain management solutions, not just injections and medications but also chiropractic treatment and physical therapy as necessary. Contact us today to learn more about how an integrative solution can deter your osteoarthritis and aid you in returning to a healthy, fully functional lifestyle.

 

 

References:

 

(1)http://health.howstuffworks.com/diseases-conditions/arthritis/osteoarthritis/what-happens-in-osteoarthritis.htm

(2)http://www.medicinenet.com/osteoarthritis/article.htm

(3)http://www.webmd.com/osteoarthritis/guide/osteoarthritis-basics

Why Your Diet Is the First Place to Look to Reduce Pain?

Dietary modifications for Pain Management

As experts in pain management, we focus on empowering our patients so that they can conquer this often debilitating health problem from all sides. One major way to target pain and reduce it is through diet. Often individuals look for specific nutrients and supplements to help certain health conditions – as with an osteoarthritis diet. Let’s look first at testing for allergies and how that can help, then at foods that generally help to contain swelling and  hence can help all pain situations. Finally, we can zero in on specific foods to help with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

Common food allergies & pain

As Dr. Susanne Bennett emphasizes in a article published by the Huffingtonpost (1), we tend to think in terms of food allergies as anaphylactic shock or vomiting, but smaller allergies can express themselves as minor headaches or stomachaches. Specific allergy testing of common food allergies, sensitivities, and gluten intolerance provides a better framework to approach individual pain management through diet.

An anti-inflammatory fruit

One food noted generally for its anti-inflammatory properties is the cherry. Cherries contain anthocyanins – as do raspberries and strawberries to lesser degrees. The ideal dose is not yet known because tests have not been conducted on humans, but recent Michigan State University research (2) suggests that these flavonoids can reduce swelling similarly to aspirin.

Ginger and coffee for pain reduction

Ginger and coffee have also been found to possibly reduce pain. Each was given to subjects in studies prior to intense physical exercise, versus groups given a placebo. The effect of coffee in pain reduction was verified one hour later, during exercise. Amazingly, the effect of the ginger was measured 24 hours later – its impact was confirmed by testimonies of each group at that time.

Helpful for Rheumatoid Arthritis & Osteoarthritis

Vitamin D — high in salmon, sardines, mushrooms, and egg yolks – can help both to reduce arthritic symptoms and to prevent these disorders to develop in the first place.  Consider adding multivitamins and omega-3 fatty acids as supplements. Those with osteoarthritis specifically should also consider taking glucosamine with chondroitin (which is off-limits for those with shellfish allergies) and SAMe (S-adenosylmethionine). A supplement to target rheumatoid arthritis is GLA (gamma-linolenic acid).

Conclusion

If you are experiencing chronic pain, try cherry, ginger, coffee, and vitamin D. For those suffering from arthritis, the rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis diet and supplement tips will aid in relief. If you have not been able to determine the source of your pain, an individual allergy test could reveal food allergies as the culprit. Need further assistance with integrative pain alleviation? Contact us anytime for help.

 

 

Resources:

1.) http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-susanne-bennett/allergies_b_1363995.html

2.) http://www.rd.com/health/wellness/can-food-relieve-pain/

3.) http://www.livestrong.com/article/376668-foods-that-reduce-pain/

4.) http://www.today.com/id/18023958/ns/today-today_health/t/feeling-stiff-foods-can-ease-pain/#.UUY9BFctfN4